DNS Meetings

DNS Monthly Meetings will be held on the FIRST TUESDAY of each month (except July and August) at 7:30 p.m. at BENEDICTION LUTHERAN CHURCH, 5575 6th Ave, Tsawwassen (map at goo.gl/iVFyV7).

After the business is concluded, and a refreshment break, there will be a Presentation by a guest Speaker (8:15 pm to 9:45 pm).


Next DNS Monthly Meeting:
TUESDAY, June 5, 2018, 7:30 p.m. at BENEDICTION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Speaker:  David & Diane Reesor
Topic:  Birdlife and the Sloth Bears of Sri Lanka

DNSPoster_2018-06June

Poster by Geof Hacker – see previous posters at DNS Posters Archive

   
David sparked an interest in photography ever since he received his Brownie Hawkeye camera on his tenth birthday. His parents encouraged his interest and obligingly allowed his darkroom setup in the basement of their home. In 1992, David won the “Best Canadian Amateur” photo of the year in the Canadian international underwater photo contest. In 2007 David co-authored a book “Predator – Life and Death in the African Bush” with African safari guide Mark Ross. David has immense patience to remain “in place” for long periods of time to photograph birds and animals, and capture the most breath-taking shots. Having lived in remote villages in Dominica, WI, and Nunavut, Canada, Diane really appreciates the local people. The things she enjoys most about them is how they live their everyday lives, their most promising traditions, festivals, and ceremonies. Some of Diane’s most challenging journeys are the ones she cherishes most. Her favorite treks include Nepal, the Inca Trail, The Compostela Route and Copper Canyon. When it comes to her love for Photography, Diane has David to thank. After meeting David, traveling and photography have now become an integral part of their life together.

Previous Monthly Meeting:
TUESDAY, May 1, 2018
Speaker:  Marg Cuthbert
Topic:  Birding and Nature in Mozambique

DNSPoster_2018-05-01May

Poster by Geof Hackersee previous posters at DNS Posters Archive

Marg on safariMarg Cuthbert was born on BC’s coast in Garden Bay and lived her early years in nature in the wilds of the province.  Twelve years of post secondary studies and studio work focused on education, fine arts and architectural design and many moves, brought her to White Rock- Surrey where she designed and built custom homes in the area. Between projects Marg travelled south exploring the southern states and Central America, appreciating the landscapes, architecture and art.  The birds and all the wild creatures in these places reinvigorated and inspired her passion for nature.

The environmental conservation bug bit in the mid 1990’s with an awareness of the development siege on Boundary Bay’s watershed and rivers.  Actively involved with the White Rock and Surrey Naturalists Conservation Committee and the Little Campbell Watershed Society, concerns led to further action in initiating the Friends of Semiahmoo Bay Society.  The goal being to work with local residents, business and government agencies to raise public awareness through community events, school programs, meaningful citizen science and habitat enhancement projects.  She hasn’t stopped working for conservation ever since, except to follow her bliss travelling to new lands to see the landscapes and wild creatures, especially the birds!


Poster by Geof Hackersee previous posters at DNS Posters Archive


see collection of previous posters at DNS Posters Archive

Delta Naturalists Speaker List 2018
Date & Speaker Bio Topic will be updated as more information is made available
Jan. 2, 2018
Dave Scott
Dave Scott is the Lower Fraser Program Coordinator for the Raincoast Conservation Foundation.  He holds a Masters degree in Resource Management from SFU. His work with RCF has included leading the Fraser estuary juvenile salmon research program, working with local conservation organizations on salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser, and submitting evidence as an intervenor in the reviews for the Trans Mountain Expansion and Roberts Bank Terminal 2 projects.  During his masters studies he examined the effects of floodgates and pump stations on fish communities in tributary streams of the Lower Fraser River. Salmon of the Lower Fraser River and estuary: Current threats and potential solutions

Lower Fraser River and estuary: Current threats and potential solutions

This is a crucial time for wild salmon that depend on the Fraser River and estuary. The Fraser watershed hosts a remarkable diversity of wild Chinook, chum, coho, pink and sockeye salmon, all which rely on habitats in the Lower Fraser. However since European colonization the area has undergone a vast transformation, and the quantity and quality of salmon habitats have been drastically reduced. While both abundance and diversity of Fraser salmon have been compromised in the last century, millions of salmon continue to annually return to the watershed supporting First Nations, Recreational and Commercial fisheries. Today, a number of development proposals threaten to push the cumulative effects of human impacts past a tipping point. Finally this talk will detail the work that Raincoast is conducting to protect and restore wild salmon populations for the ecosystems, wildlife and communities that rely on them.

Feb. 6, 2018
Laura Stewart
Birding Where No One Has Birded Before: Laura will talk about her experiences as a CO OP student working for Environment Canada in boreal Saskatchewan.  The emphasis was on songbirds of the boreal forest.
Mar. 6, 2018
Eliza Olson
A retired teacher, Olson spends more than 40 hours a week at the Burns Bog Conservation Society.  Since 1987, Eliza has donated countless hours for the preservation of Burns Bog.  Her degree in education has enabled her to skilfully educate others on the importance of saving the bog. Burns Bog: Ecology and Threats
Olson is passionate about the bog and its important role in offsetting global warming.Did you know that sphagnum moss was here in the days of the dinosaurs?  It holds up to 20 times its weight in water.  Burns Bog stores 10 times more carbon than tropical rainforests!  That’s why it is called a carbon sink.Burns Bog was recognized as an internationally significant wetland when it became part of the Fraser River Ramsar site in 2012.  However, it still faces dangers from construction of roads, and proposals to develop the land.
Apr. 3, 2018
Ross Dixon
Ross Dixon is the Raincoast Conservation Foundation Communications and Development Director.  Originally from Cumbria, in the beautiful Lake District of England, he moved to Canada several years ago, in part inspired by the work of Raincoast and their mission to protect the land, waters and wildlife of coastal British Columbia. Safeguarding Coastal Carnivores

Ross will discuss Raincoast’s wildlife welfare ethic and their use of rigorous, peer-reviewed science and community engagement – “informed-advocacy”.  This research includes extensive study of bears and wolves on BC’s coast and informs Raincoast’s conservation campaigns.

Ross will specifically discuss Raincoast’s campaign to Safeguard Coastal Carnivores. Partnered with Coastal First Nations, this campaign aims to permanently end all commercial trophy hunting of large carnivores in the Great Bear Rainforest.

May 1, 2018
Marg Cuthbert
Friends of Semiahmoo Bay

Marg Cuthbert was born on BC’s coast in Garden Bay and lived her early years in nature in the wilds of the province.  Twelve years of post secondary studies and studio work focused on education, fine arts and architectural design and many moves, brought her to White Rock- Surrey where she designed and built custom homes in the area. Between projects Marg travelled south exploring the southern states and Central America, appreciating the landscapes, architecture and art.  The birds and all the wild creatures in these places reinvigorated and inspired her passion for nature.

The environmental conservation bug bit in the mid 1990’s with an awareness of the development siege on Boundary Bay’s watershed and rivers.  Actively involved with the White Rock and Surrey Naturalists Conservation Committee and the Little Campbell Watershed Society, concerns led to further action in initiating the Friends of Semiahmoo Bay Society.  The goal being to work with local residents, business and government agencies to raise public awareness through community events, school programs, meaningful citizen science and habitat enhancement projects.  She hasn’t stopped working for conservation ever since, except to follow her bliss travelling to new lands to see the landscapes and wild creatures, especially the birds!

Birding and Nature in Mozambique
June 5, 2018
David & Diane Reesor
Birdlife and the Sloth Bears of Sri Lanka
Sep. 4, 2018
Oct. 2, 2018
Nov. 6, 2018
Dec. 3, 2018

Tentative schedule for DNCB outings:  see DNS Upcoming Events page.

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