About DNCB

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DNCB at Brunswick Point (Jan. 3, 2017 – #2017-01)  – Roger Meyer photo

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DNCB at Blackie Spit, Surrey (Oct. 29, 2014 – #2014-43) photo by Roger Meyer

DNCB at Reifel

DNCB at Reifel (March 18, 2013 – #2013-11)

DNCB @ Terra Nova, Richmond (May 30, 2012 – #2012-25)

Delta Nature Casual Birders is a group of people who like watching birds, mostly around Boundary Bay and within the Fraser Delta.   Anyone with a similar interest is welcome to join us.

January 2017:  we meet on Tuesdays at Petra’s Arts Kafe, 1200 56 Street, Tsawwassen http://goo.gl/maps/ym6W1, for 7:30 am departure, and return about lunchtime.  Tom Bearss, President of Delta Naturalists’ Society, organizes and leads the walks, and when he isn’t around, someone else (like Roger or Terry) leads the group.  What day we go, and where we go, depends on the democratic will of the group.  In fall/winter, it’s usually Monday or Tuesday @ 8:00 am, in spring/summer, usually Wednesday @ 7:30 am.

We also have quarterly Birds on the Bay Outings (BOTB) on the second Wednesday of March, June, September, December, which are advertised locally; these leave from historic Cammidge House at 9 am, walking around the Centennial Park/Boundary Bay beachfront towards Beach Grove, and returning to Cammidge House for coffee and snacks at 11:30 am.

Check out the Reports of our outings posted at https://dncb.wordpress.com/ and also the photos taken by DNCB regulars at www.flickr.com/groups/dncb  For photos taken on a specific Outing, e.g. 2017-03, click the magnifying glass icon in the “Photo Pool” row, and add 2017-03 to “flickr_search_dncb-photosDNCB Photos” in the Search box at the top of the page.  To find out more, contact Tom.

Point Roberts, near Marina

DNCB @ Point Roberts, Washington (April 11, 2012 – #2012-18)

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9 Responses to About DNCB

  1. Katy Mateer says:

    Hi, there are several of us who would be interested in joining the Wed, Aug 16 DNCB birding outing scheduled in Point Roberts. But we are already in the Point. Is there any chance of meeting up with the group here, allowing us to avoid the border twice? Three of us have a home here and we have two visitors from California (experienced birders) who would be interested in joining the outing. Thanks so much for a reply.

    Cheers,
    Katy

  2. Graham Harkley says:

    Hello, I am a teacher at Delta Secondary School and I have a Grade 12 student who would like to get involved with your group. How would she go about doing that?
    Thanks,Graham Harkley, Teacher

  3. Shawn says:

    Hi. I am new to Ladner and recently put out a hummingbird feeder. Me and my boys have been eagerly awaiting an appearance, but three weeks and not a sighting. Are there many hummingbirds in Ladner? I returned from the interior of bc recently and was amazed at all the hummingbirds visiting my parents feeder. Any suggestions? Oh, I did see one fly by today, hovered briefly by the patio (not near our feeder) then flew away!

    Shawn

    • dncb says:

      Hi Shawn
      Tom suggested I answer your question about hummingbirds in Ladner. There are two species that could come to your feeder. The most likely one at this time of year is the Rufous Hummingbird: the male has orange-red plumage, with a really bright red, iridescent throat when the light falls on it, and the female is a mixture of orange and green. There is also the Anna’s Hummingbird, which is a greener species and the male has a deep crimson throat. Anna’s stay through the winter but Rufous hummers head back south to Mexico in late summer/early fall.
      When a hummingbird feeder goes up for the first time it can take a few weeks for the birds to find it. Do you have some flowering plants nearby as well? A hanging basket with lots of red flowers can help. Chances are a female looking for nectar and insects will cruise by eventually and young birds wander around later in the summer, exploring the neighbourhood, so one of those should find it.
      Be persistent, keep your eyes open and I am sure you will be lucky. Once the birds have found it, they are much more likely to stick around and visit regularly.
      Cheers,
      Anne

      Anne Murray
      Nature Guides BC
      Delta

  4. Hi Tom,
    I was out for an afternoon walk today about 1:30 PM on the Ladner dike
    (access at the end of River Rd. by the Swenson farm) where a photographer alerted me to two Great Horned Owls in the “clump” of trees adjacent to the farm at the start of the trail. Apparently, someone (conservation officer?) had climbed an evergreen tree where the owls had presumably been roosting, and so the temporarily displaced owls perched on adjacent trees and observed the proceedings.

    Just thought you may be interested….as I understand that Great Horned Owls are rarely seen.

    Would love to see the DNCB on Twitter!
    Best wishes.
    Vida

    • dncb says:

      Thanks Vida. Interesting observations and comments. This is a Banner Year for Snowy Owls at Boundary Bay. We also see Short-eared Owls there as well. The only place I have seen Great-horned Owls along the dike is at Brunswick Point. Cheers: Tom

  5. Kelly Sekhon says:

    Hi Tom,

    Good website and blog. Now you can take my address off your list. I can read all about your trips by subscribing to the blog.

    Good Birding!

    Kelly

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