Casual Birding Trip #120 to Stanley Park November 22, 2010

Hooded Mergansers by Roger Meyer

Eight casual birders met this morning at Petra’s but it turned out that Don and Rochelle were just there for moral support.  Minus 2 degrees and overcast but John, Kay, Hans, Terry, Lorna and Roger decided to brave the elements and bird Stanley Park for a change.  Parking near the Stone Bridge on Lost Lagoon we were rewarded with several pairs of Hooded Mergansers, a few Buffleheads, both males and females of Greater and Lesser Scaup, lots of Mallards, and very few Wigeon.  At the Stone Bridge a man was feeding the smaller birds and had the most Spotted Towhees we’ve ever seen in one spot.  There must have been over a dozen and they were, along with Fox Sparrows, Juncos, Song Sparrows, Black-capped Chickadees, and Golden-crowned Sparrows, eating out of the man’s hand.  There were raccoons all about and at one spot a man was sitting on a fold-out chair feeding two adults and two young ones.  This must have been a daily occurence as it appeared the raccoons were waiting for him to appear.  We decided to walk completely around the lagoon and on the north side observed several Varied Thrushes with vivid coloration.

From the lagoon we walked over to the Second Beach area where there was an enormous flock of Surf Scoters.  Also there were two groups of Harlequin Ducks, some Barrow’s and Common Goldeneyes as well as a Red-breasted Merganser.  A flock of crows was feeding on mussels that they first dropped on the cement apron of the swimming pool so that they would break open.  The result was an enormous scattering of shells on the apron.  Farther off shore were a few Pelagic Cormorants.

A drive around the park didn’t provide and further sightings until we reached Third Beach where we saw more Harlequin, Surf Scoters, Pelagic Cormorants, and four Black Oystercatchers.

Considering the very cold temperature the birding was rewarding, especially the large number of Hooded Mergansers and the many Varied Thrushes.  It was nice to see so many turn out and just goes to show what a hardy bunch birders are.

 

The group with a Mute Swan

Lesser Scaup

Hooded Mergansers

Spotted Towhee

Varied Thrush

Raccoons waiting for a friend

 

Photos by Terry Carr. More photos at

http://picasaweb.google.com/terrancecarr/

Advertisements

About dncb

DNS: Delta Naturalists are a group of nature lovers whose aim is to foster interest in the natural history of the Fraser delta by sharing and enjoying nature and promoting environmental awareness and conservation. DNCB: Delta Nats Casual Birders is a group of Casual Birders who go Birding at different locations each week, usually within the Lower Mainland or in nearby Washington State.
This entry was posted in *DNCB, Lost Lagoon, Second Beach, Stanley Park, Third Beach. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Casual Birding Trip #120 to Stanley Park November 22, 2010

  1. Tom Bearss says:

    Great report, Roger, and some awesome photos too, Terry. It looks very cold there the way you are all dressed; you are a hardy bunch. I birded McCarty Lake today near Mandurah in WA with a group of 25 birders. About 20,000 birds on this cozy, shallow lake which will be dry in a couple of weeks. Lots of Black Swans, Black-necked and Banded Stilts, Sharp-tailed Sandpipers, Red-capped Plovers, Red-necked Stints, Red-necked Avocets, Curlew Sandpipers and of course several Yellow-billed Spoonbills (eat your heart out Roger). Interestingly, I found a lone “weirdo” bird which turned out to be an Oriental Pratincole, which most of the participants had never seen before. So I’m now “in” with the group. Hopefully someone will send me photos to share. See you after Dec. 7. Cheers: Tom

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s